Foot & Ankle

Deformity

Foot and Ankle Deformity

What is tib post dysfunction?

Painful flatfoot, also known as pes planovalgus or flatfoot deformity, is a condition in which the arch of the foot collapses. This causes the foot to flatten and turn outward. This can result in pain, swelling, and difficulty walking, as well as an increased risk of developing other foot problems, such as bunions, hammertoes, and plantar fasciitis.

One common feature of painful flatfoot is posterior tibial tendon dysfunction (PTTD). The posterior tibial tendon supports the arch of the foot and becomes inflamed or torn. Whether flat feet lead to posterior tibial tendon degeneration and tearing, or a diseased posterior tibial tendon leads to flat feet is debated amongst experts.

Symptoms of painful flatfoot or PTTD can include:

  • Pain or tenderness in the arch or heel of the foot
  • Swelling or inflammation in the foot or ankle
  • A feeling of instability or weakness in the foot or ankle
  • Difficulty walking or standing for extended periods
  • Development of calluses or corns on the foot

Treatment for painful flatfoot or PTTD typically involves a combination of non-surgical and surgical options, depending on the severity of the condition and the presence of symptoms. Non-surgical treatment options may include physical therapy, custom orthotics or arch supports, and the use of assistive devices such as braces or walking boots. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair or reconstruct the damaged tendon or stabilize the foot and ankle joint.

The specific treatment plan for painful flatfoot or PTTD will depend on the individual case and should be determined in consultation with a qualified orthopedic surgeon. Early intervention and treatment can help to prevent the condition from worsening and reduce the risk of developing other foot problems.

What is a cavovarus foot?

A cavovarus foot is a condition in which the foot has a high arch (cavus) and turns inward (varus), leading to an unstable and rigid foot structure. This can result in pain, instability, and difficulty walking, as well as an increased risk of developing other foot problems, such as ankle sprains, stress fractures, and calluses.

 

Cavovarus foot can be caused by a variety of factors, including genetics, neurological disorders, and muscle imbalances. In some cases, the condition may be idiopathic, meaning that there is no known cause.

Symptoms of cavovarus foot can include:

  • High arches or a visible curve in the foot
  • Difficulty fitting shoes properly, or wearing through them too quickly
  • Instability or difficulty walking on uneven surfaces
  • A fractured fifth metatarsal that won’t heal
  • Pain or discomfort in the foot, ankle, or leg
  • Development of calluses or corns on the foot

Treatment for cavovarus foot typically involves a combination of non-surgical and surgical options, depending on the severity of the condition and the presence of symptoms. Non-surgical treatment options may include physical therapy, custom orthotics or arch supports, and the use of assistive devices such as braces or walking boots. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to correct the foot structure and improve stability and function.

The specific treatment plan for cavovarus foot will depend on the individual case. Early intervention and treatment can help to prevent the condition from worsening and reduce the risk of developing other foot problems.